Is 90% of air pollution caused by 25% of cars? Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Monday, 08 June 2015 01:41

A study conducted at the University of Toronto in Canada indicates that yes, the majority of automotive pollutants are coming from a very small number of vehicles and the result is premature deaths from breathing the harmful substances.

To examine the emissions of 100,000 vehicles, the researchers used a technique that was capable of taking immediate readings. They set the equipment up on College Street in Toronto and monitored the results. The analysis found that just 25 percent of the cars tested created 95 percent of the total soot and 93 percent of the carbon monoxide.

"As we looked at the exhaust coming out of individual vehicles, we saw so many variations. How you drive, hard acceleration, age of the vehicle, how the car is maintained – these are things we can influence that can all have an effect on pollution," author Greg Evans said in the university's announcement of the results.

In a separate study, Evans and his team used a mobile lab to take real-time emissions readings. While air quality is known to be poor even up to 270 yards away from major roads, the researchers found that pollutants can still be double their normal levels over 300 yards away for those downwind of a highway. People living around multiple high-traffic areas can experience even higher levels.

While both studies focus on emissions only within small geographic areas, they indicate that there's still a lot to be done to lower air pollution from vehicles.

Read more here.

Last Updated on Monday, 08 June 2015 01:45
 
Precautions for Driving in Rain Showers Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 15:28

Driving in the rain is difficult. Accidents increase by 203% as soon as precipitation appears. Driving safely in rainy conditions requires caution and careful driving. The tips below will help with this.

Safety starts before you drive, and your goal should be to see and be seen. Replace windshield wiper inserts that leave streaks or don’t clear the glass in a single swipe. Make sure all headlights, taillights, brake lights and turn signals are properly functioning so other drivers will see you during downpours. Turn on your headlights whenever you drive.

Proper tire tread depth and inflation are imperative to maintaining good traction on wet roadways. Check tread depth with a quarter inserted upside down into the tire groove. If you can see above Washington’s head, start shopping for new tires. Check each tire’s pressure, including the spare, at least once a month… and be sure to check the pressure when the tires are cold.

Avoid Cruise Control

Most modern cars feature cruise control. This feature works great in dry conditions, but when used in wet conditions, the chance of losing control of the vehicle can increase. To prevent loss of traction, the driver may need to reduce the car’s speed by lifting off the accelerator, which cannot be accomplished when cruise control is engaged.

To Read More Tips Click Here

 

 
Precautions for Driving in Rain Showers Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 15:28

Driving in the rain is difficult. Accidents increase by 203% as soon as precipitation appears. Driving safely in rainy conditions requires caution and careful driving. The tips below will help with this.

Safety starts before you drive, and your goal should be to see and be seen. Replace windshield wiper inserts that leave streaks or don’t clear the glass in a single swipe. Make sure all headlights, taillights, brake lights and turn signals are properly functioning so other drivers will see you during downpours. Turn on your headlights whenever you drive.

Proper tire tread depth and inflation are imperative to maintaining good traction on wet roadways. Check tread depth with a quarter inserted upside down into the tire groove. If you can see above Washington’s head, start shopping for new tires. Check each tire’s pressure, including the spare, at least once a month… and be sure to check the pressure when the tires are cold.

Avoid Cruise Control

Most modern cars feature cruise control. This feature works great in dry conditions, but when used in wet conditions, the chance of losing control of the vehicle can increase. To prevent loss of traction, the driver may need to reduce the car’s speed by lifting off the accelerator, which cannot be accomplished when cruise control is engaged.

To Read More Tips Click Here

 

 
Precautions for Driving in Rain Showers Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 15:28

Driving in the rain is difficult. Accidents increase by 203% as soon as precipitation appears. Driving safely in rainy conditions requires caution and careful driving. The tips below will help with this.

Safety starts before you drive, and your goal should be to see and be seen. Replace windshield wiper inserts that leave streaks or don’t clear the glass in a single swipe. Make sure all headlights, taillights, brake lights and turn signals are properly functioning so other drivers will see you during downpours. Turn on your headlights whenever you drive.

Proper tire tread depth and inflation are imperative to maintaining good traction on wet roadways. Check tread depth with a quarter inserted upside down into the tire groove. If you can see above Washington’s head, start shopping for new tires. Check each tire’s pressure, including the spare, at least once a month… and be sure to check the pressure when the tires are cold.

Avoid Cruise Control

Most modern cars feature cruise control. This feature works great in dry conditions, but when used in wet conditions, the chance of losing control of the vehicle can increase. To prevent loss of traction, the driver may need to reduce the car’s speed by lifting off the accelerator, which cannot be accomplished when cruise control is engaged.

To Read More Tips Click Here

 

 
Hydrogen fuel cells winning the alternative fuel debate Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Friday, 27 February 2015 22:52

The debate about whether electric or hydrogen is better when it comes to alternative fuel is ongoing among automakers. At least for the moment though, hydrogen fuel cells seem to be winning.

The potentially game-changing Hyundai Tucson can be refueled in less than 10 minutes, according to the automaker, and "makes the transition from gasoline to hydrogen as seamless as possible," said a report from Automotive News.

"The hydrogen fuel cell debate is no longer a chicken-and-egg conundrum. The fuel cell vehicle has arrived first. It works," wrote Richard Truett after driving the Hyundai Tucson.

The compact sport-utility vehicle, which uses fuel cell technology to convert hydrogen into electricity, has received an approving nod from Consumer Reports as well. 

"It drives much like a normal Tucson, but without an engine it's actually much quieter. Hyundai claims it will go 265 miles before you have to refuel it. That's pretty amazing for an electric vehicle," said Jake Fisher, auto test director for Consumer Reports.

That kind of driving range trumps just about anything offered for a pure electric car. Tesla's Model S famously leads the electric-vehicle market with a 265-mile battery range, but the sedan is only available for those who can afford to pay upward of $70,000.

Plus a Tesla takes about 20 minutes for the battery to charge halfway, while a fuel-cell vehicle can typically be refilled for full driving range in about 10 minutes.

Read the full story here.

 
US President Warns Drivers that Gas Prices Won't Stay Cheap Forever Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Thursday, 22 January 2015 20:07

President Obama is encouraging American's to choose fuel-efficient cars today, because gas may not be so cheap in the future.

Low gas prices typically make fuel-efficient cars less attractive to consumers, and right now prices are very low indeed.

Yet President Barack Obama hopes U.S. car buyers won't clamor for gas guzzlers.

He cautioned that cheap gas prices won’t last indefinitely, and encouraged Americans to buy more fuel-efficient cars in an interview with The Detroit News.

That interview came just ahead of Obama’s speech at a Ford assembly plant in Wayne, Michigan, Wednesday promoting the success of the auto-industry bailout.

The plant produces the Focus and C-Max, but it’s been idled due to low demand for those fuel-efficient vehicles.

One has to admit, that’s a bit ironic.

Obama said the current low gas prices are temporary, and that people are better off buying more-efficient cars because of long-term environmental benefits—and to avoid a rude awakening when prices eventually increase.

If prices suddenly return to $3.50 a gallon, Obama said, “you are going to not be real happy.”

Read the full story here.

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 January 2015 20:11
 
2014 Known for Advancements in Green Cars Print E-mail
Written by AlterMyEnergy   
Wednesday, 31 December 2014 00:00

With another year winding down, it's time to take a look at the advancements that have been made throughout the year.

So how did 2014 measure up in terms of boosting vehicle fuel efficiency and reducing emissions?

According to the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) advocacy group, it was a very good year indeed.

In a summary blog post, the NRDC says tightening fuel-efficiency standards and increased electric-car adoption made 2014 particularly green.

The group cites Environmental Protection Agency data showing record new-car average fuel economy of 24.1 mpg for 2013 models (the most recent with available data).

That upward trend is likely to continue in 2014. The Wards Auto Fuel Economy Index already estimates average fuel economy at 25.1 mpg for the first 11 months of 2014.

The NRDC also cites U.S. Energy Information Administration data showing that gasoline usage dropped 1.3 percent in the first nine months of 2014, compared to the same period in 2013.

The same research anticipates a further 1.4-percent drop in demand in 2015--despite currently-low gas prices and an expected increase in personal-vehicle use of 0.5 percent.

That's largely due to efficiency improvements resulting from impending Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations--which mandate a fleet-average 54.5 mpg by 2025 (equivalent to 42 mpg on the window sticker).

Read the full story here.

Last Updated on Friday, 02 January 2015 13:43
 
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